• Print

Registration Open for Tools of Change for Publishing Conference '09

Registration is now open for the next Tools of Change for Publishing conference, being held Feb. 9-11, 2009 at the Marriot Marquis Times Square in New York City. From the press release:

The third annual TOC Conference will decipher the tools of change for the industry and help cut through the hype in order to reach a more profitable future in publishing. From authoring, editing, and layout to distribution and consumption, new technologies will continue to change all aspects of publishing. TOC 2009 will focus on industry-wide strategic issues, like the changing retail and supply-chain landscape. In addition to examining “long-view” trends, the conference will also supply practical tales from pioneers already experimenting and innovating on the digital frontier of paid content.

Confirmed speakers include:

  • Laurel Touby, founder and CEO of MediaBistro
  • Jeff Jarvis, blogger and author of What Would Google Do?
  • Nick Bilton, New York Times R&D Lab
  • Chris Baty, creator of National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo)
  • Jason Epstein, chairman, OnDemand Books

Here’s a sampling of planned sessions:

  • “What Does the Future Look Like for Book Publishers?” by Sara Lloyd of Pan Macmillan
  • “The Rise of eBooks” by Mark Coker of Smashwords, Inc., David Rothman of TeleRead.org, Joe Wikert of O’Reilly Media, Russell Wilcox of E Ink, and author April L. Hamilton
  • “Smart Women Read eBooks” by Kassia Krozser of Booksquare.com
  • “Youth and Creativity: Emerging Trends in Self-Expression and Publishing” by Julie Baher of Adobe and Bill Westerman of Create with Context
  • “eBooks: How Soon Is Now?” by Peter Balis of John Wiley and Sons
  • “If at First You Don’t Succeed: Using Agile to Relaunch XML at Cengage Learning” by Greg Shepherd of Cengage Learning
  • “Lessons from a Book’s Simultaneous Publication in Print and on the Web” by Stephen Smith of Crossway Books
  • “The Long Tail Needs Community” by Gavin Bell of Nature
  • “What Happens When Anyone Can Edit Your Book, Online?” by John Broughton, author of O’Reilly’s Wikipedia: The Missing Manual
  • “Speaking the Same Language: Universal Technology Standards in Publishing and Bookselling” by Lila Bailey of Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, Otis Chandler of Goodreads.com, Aaron Miller of BookGlutton.com, Kevin Smokler of Booktour.com, and Tim Spalding of LibraryThing
  • “Making an Impact with Travel Content–in Print, Online, and Mobile” by Ensley Eikenberg of Frommer’s
  • “Where Do You Go with 40,000 Readers?: A Study in Online Community Building” by Ron Hogan of Beatrice.com, Patrick Nielsen Hayden of Tor Books, and author John Scalzi
  • “Crafting a Digital Road Map: One Publisher’s Path to Success” by Adrienne Kinney and Andrew Malkin of Rodale
  • “If Shakespeare Had a Hard Drive: The Challenge of the Born-Digital Belletrist” by Matthew G. Kirschenbaum of the University of Maryland
  • “Building Old World Publishing Values into New World Automated Workflows” by Phil Zuckerman of Applewood Books

Early registration, which offers a savings of $200, will end Dec. 18, 2009. Registration information and additional details are available through the Tools of Change for Publishing Conference site.

Share Your Success Stories and Failures (and Get In Free)

One of the ongoing goals for the TOC Conference is to encourage the sharing of success stories and of the lessons learned from failed experiments and initiatives. For 2009, we’re going to try something a bit different to add to the discussion, and we want your help.

Tell us about your experience with a new technology, technique, or strategy based on the shifting publishing landscape. We’re particularly interested in efforts based on what you learned at a previous TOC Conference. We’ll pick four submissions to present as part of a panel at the 2009 TOC Conference. If you’re selected, you’ll receive a complimentary admission to the full conference.

We’re looking for personal accounts. We want to hear the key actions that led to success or failure, as well as what you’ve learned from the experience. Submissions can be in whatever format best suits your story: text, video, etc.

Send your story to toc AT oreilly.com before Nov. 10.

tags: , ,

Comments are closed.