ENTRIES TAGGED "antitrust"

Publishing News: HTML5 will be the future of publishing

Content is best served in browsers, indie booksellers sue Amazon and Big Six, and ASU reimagines libraries as startup incubators.

MIT Technology Review publisher, UC Berkley students bet on HTML5

At a recent executive retreat, Beet.TV sat down with MIT Technology Review editor and publisher Jason Pontin, who said that HTML5 will be the future of publishing. In a video interview (embedded below), Pontin says the basic content publishers produce — text and video — “can be much more easily offered as scripts, as processes, inside an HTML5 wrapper inside a browser application … A publisher can do almost everything they want to do on the web for multiple platforms with the same code — why make your life harder?”

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Publishing News: HTML5 may be winning the war against apps

Publishing News: HTML5 may be winning the war against apps

Publisher moves lean toward HTML5, MIT students present news reporting solutions, and Penguin and Macmillan respond to the DOJ.

Some are sticking with apps, but many publishers are choosing HTML5-based solutions; students at MIT have solutions for news; and Penguin and Macmillan tell the DOJ they weren't involved in price fixing.

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Publishing News: Kindle Fire and "your ad here"

Publishing News: Kindle Fire and "your ad here"

Amazon pitches Kindle Fire home screen ads, Apple says DOJ complaint is "fundamentally flawed," and Craig Mod muses on covers.

Amazon is reportedly peddling new ad space on its Kindle Fire home screen, Apple responds to the DOJ, and Craig Mod says its time to hack digital book covers.

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Publishing News: Agency pricing, out of the pan and into the fire

Publishing News: Agency pricing, out of the pan and into the fire

Publishers face antitrust investigations, newspapers must control their ads and data, and a look at the most-read web authors.

Antitrust investigations into agency pricing were opened by the EU and the US. Elsewhere, David Soloff at AdAge offered much-needed advice for newspaper/magazine revenue, and Read it Later used its data to identify the web's top authors.

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