ENTRIES TAGGED "breaking the page"

How can we redefine the book?

Where does the "book" stop and the "application" begin?

A book may no longer be a physical object, but its ordinary definition remains straightforward as a “written composition that is intended for publication”. Traditional or digital, we feel confident in our ability to recognise a book.

We barely remember today that early electronic platforms offered fewer visual options than the printed page, and encouraged the release of text-only editions from which even the original covers had been removed. Four short years after the launch of the original Kindle, LCD screens were becoming quite popular in mainstream readers. Today, they are almost everywhere, some of them brighter and sharper than their desktop counterparts.

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Losing the book as a symbol

Publishing needs to build new symbols for the digital age

Transitioning the publishing industry to digital technologies involves lifting the words out of printed pages, and pouring them into the amorphous containers we call ebooks. Books are no longer the tangible, brick-shaped presence they were: they must, instead, be stretched and poured into and onto any device fit for reading, from the laptop to the Kindle to the phone.

In fact, “the book” no longer designates the physical expression of the text, but the text itself, a self-contained bundle of information, whose structure and boundaries have been jointly defined by the author and the publisher. Picking up a book where you left it no longer involves picking up the same object, but rather the same text on whatever device happens to be at hand.

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Quid pro quo will define the author-publisher relationship

Quid pro quo will define the author-publisher relationship

Peter Meyers on HTML5, ebook formats and the evolution of publishers and authors.

In this video interview, author and digital book producer Peter Meyers addresses the state of ebooks and book apps and weighs in on the changing relationship between authors and publishers.

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Research and restraint: Two more things to add to your digital publishing toolkit

Research and restraint: Two more things to add to your digital publishing toolkit

"Breaking the Page" author Peter Meyers on the tools, tech and future of digital publishing.

Since 2009, Peter Meyers has immersed himself in the tools and companies in the digital publishing world. Here he shares what he's learned, who's doing digital publishing well, and what's surprised him.

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Now available: "Breaking the Page" preview edition

Now available: "Breaking the Page" preview edition

The big question: How do we make digital books as satisfying as their print predecessors?

The three chapters in the free preview edition of "Breaking the Page: Transforming Books and the Reading Experience" focus on browsing, searching, and navigating.

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Sometimes one screen isn't enough

Sometimes one screen isn't enough

A look at 10 multi-screen projects and experiments.

Peter Meyers rounds up 10 content projects that span multiple screens. Some involve separate physical displays while others use different virtual windows.

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What we could do with really big touchscreens

What we could do with really big touchscreens

Ten-inch tablets are just the start of the touchscreen publishing revolution.

If we could combine the touchscreen's ability to signal our layout wishes with the large displays and workspaces that many of us enjoy at our work desks, wouldn't that change the kinds of documents we create?

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Links on the side

Links on the side

A simple solution for including hyperlinks without undermining focus.

Digital documents that help readers focus are the ones that we're most likely to remember. Those that send us scampering around the web will be more easily forgotten.

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Six ways to think about an "infinite canvas"

Six ways to think about an "infinite canvas"

How would content look, feel and act in an unlimited space?

Imagine a canvas that's elastic and infinite. Now consider the content that could exist in this domain. How would it work? How would you interact with it? Pete Meyers considers these questions and more.

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Linking in ebooks: How much is too much?

Linking in ebooks: How much is too much?

Ebook hyperlinks don't always lead to a smooth reading experience.

Ebook producers must decide if the destinations behind embedded links are worth the disruptions they might cause.

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