ENTRIES TAGGED "content"

Homo abudantia: From Oldowan to Ubiquity

The 'Expression Era' and our long history of content, container, and context

[This is the first in a series of articles intended to identify key watershed moments in the history of content and container.  Our intent is to frame the current moment in this story so that we may better understand the unique and not-so-unique promise of the binary revolution.]

Books, roasting pans, websites, bottle caps: all these are artifacts. They are devised and built by humans; they are physical manifestations of our thoughts, our ‘things’. Our civilization’s vast index of things did not appear sui generi. Rather, our present artifact collection is part of a much larger, older cloud of artifacts – a mist of achievement that has been seeping from our kind and surrounding us all since before humans were human.

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Mobile native publishing: The rise of dynamic content services

Why our concept of content must evolve in the post-PC era.

One reason that industry disruptions prove so vexing to market leaders is that disruptive waves simultaneously barrel through assumptions about customer needs, industry economics and operational best practices.

Consider the case of the motion picture business, an industry that was disrupted when the “talkie” — once derided as a costly gimmick — subsumed the silent picture in the 1920s.

The takeaway from the film industry’s transition is instructive. The talkie not only changed how movies were made and the economics of the business itself, but critically, it changed our concept of what a movie could be. Read more…

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Speaking as a publishing recruiter and author

The best talent isn't always in the most obvious places

Mining dollars from the digital age. It’s what every publisher is concerned with lately. In my day job as recruiter, as I like to say, I’ve clinically observed publishers struggling with the new realities. By night, as I assume my guise as publisher and author, I join in the industry’s goal to utilize the latest e-tools to sell content.

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Flipboard and the end of "sourciness"

Flipboard and the end of "sourciness"

Flipboard's focus is on the content. Sources and platforms take a backseat.

One of Flipboard's goals is to bring quality content to readers without focusing on the content's source or original platform.

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Photos from New York Times R&D Lab

Nick Bilton was a hit yesterday at the TOC Conference, and during his keynote he talked about what they’re working on with content at the NYT R&D Lab. Nick was kind enough to give a few of us a private tour earlier this week, and here’s some photos from the trip:…

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A Correction!

Frank Grazioli, of Wiley, writes in to correct my last post about taxonomies: Wiley has been exploring taxonomies for its travel content business; the cooking/psych/accounting spaces might be our next logical opportunities because the disciplines are well developed, specific, etc., that content is authored or edited in fairly controlled templates that map to our own XML content models and our…

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Redefining Professional Content and Accepting Digital's Limitations

Scott Karp's 10 observations about the future of media inspired a few thoughts on the shifting definition of "professional" and the limitations of digital.

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Slides from "What Publishers Need to Know about Digitization" Webcast

Slides from the "What Publishers Need to Know about Digitization" webcast.

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The Confusion Between Content and Containers

The digital realm allows content and containers to exist separately, but their old bond is still tough to break

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A Plea for Passion in Museums

This is a great post about passion for when we talk about our profession, about what we are all trying to do, whether we are librarians, technologists, publishers, or work in museums. It speaks to why libraries and museums often feel "dead." From Museum 2.0: Museums shy away from presenting passionate views. It's ironic that we expect visitors to…

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