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iRex's Large E-Reader Aimed at Business Crowd

E-reader manufacturer iRex Technologies is targeting the business market with its Reader 1000. From Forbes:

The iRex Reader 1000 offers a 10.2-inch diagonal E-Ink screen, far larger than Kindle’s 6-inch screen or even iRex’s own 8.1-inch diagonal iLiad, its last e-book model. That stretched display is designed to work with any file format, be it an e-book, a full-sized PDF, a Word document or HTML. Like earlier iRex devices, it sports a stylus and touch screen for taking notes and marking documents.

A basic Reader 1000 with no Wi-Fi or cellular connectivity and a read-only screen costs $650. The fully-equipped edition goes for $850.

As Forbes notes, Plastic Logic’s recently announced e-reader is also aimed at the business market.

(Via Jose Alonso Furtado’s Twitter stream)

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  • http://www.digital-book-readers.com/ dbReader

    By the way iRex has deep roots in Philips. Back in September 2001 Philips assigned a group of specialists to organize iRex group with the main goal – to develop the first commercial Electronic Paper Display to the world. First ebook readers from them were with Philips company logo.

  • bowerbird

    > Back in September 2001 Philips assigned a group of
    > specialists to organize iRex group with the main goal –
    > to develop the first commercial Electronic Paper Display

    and every year since, like the swallows returning to capistrano,
    a flock of press releases is issued which earnestly reports that
    the goal will come to fruition “in the next year”, depending on
    whether or not “the next round of funding” can be obtained…

    and — speak of the devil! — here is the latest in that series:
    > http://blog.wired.com/gadgets/2009/04/first-pocket-e.html

    so yeah, this latest call via the intertubes for yet _more_ funding
    explains why a post from 6 months ago drew a comment today…

    e-ink seems to have been a big ponzi scheme from the outset,
    and will certainly never be inexpensive, simply because it has
    collected far too many investors who now need to be paid back.

    it’s good to see that some things never change…

    but i can’t help but think that if the world had known, back in
    2001, that e-ink would still be a not-good-yet technology in
    _2009_, we would have turned to some other methods instead,
    and saved ourselves a whole lot of the wait-and-wait-and-wait
    misery we’ve experienced as we waited and waited and waited
    for e-ink to deliver on the promises that it always promised us.

    waiting for e-ink has been like waiting for godot, and if there
    is _any_ one thing that has stalled e-books, it has been delays
    caused by our stupidity in always believing the e-ink hype…
    (and the idiot’s teleblawg breathlessly reported every bit of it.)

    but hey, if you know any investors who have money to waste,
    send ‘em over to the readius people, ok? because there is
    no better way to waste your money than to invest in e-ink…

    -bowerbird