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What to expect in EPUB3

Bob Kasher on EPUB3's key areas: multimedia, language support, and accessibility.

Just as publishers are wrapping their heads — and workflows — around the current version of EPUB, a new release is scheduled for May. The EPUB3 draft is set to publish for comment later this month, giving publishers and developers their first blush at what the release will mean to them.

In the following interview, Bob Kasher, business development manager for integrated solutions at Book Masters and a member of the International Digital Publishing Forum EPUB Working Group, highlights some of the changes the new version will bring to the publishing industry. Kasher is scheduled to speak in depth on EPUB3 at February’s Tools of Change for Publishing conference in New York.


What are some of the major changes EPUB3 will bring to digital publishing?

Bob KasherBob Kasher: There are three key areas EPUB3 is focused around: language support, greater accessibility, and increased multimedia support. Language support will allow EPUB3 to save and search non-Roman scripts — such as Japanese, Chinese and Arabic — as font characters rather than JPEGs, as in current EPUB support. This will make a much broader range of literature available to current and future reading devices from base EPUB files. It will truly internationalize EPUB.

EPUB3 will also be better at integrating the current DAISY accessibility standards, to help make reading devices of greater usefulness to visually impaired readers.

EPUB3 will be much more adept at supporting multimedia capabilities for both HTML5-based devices and the coming generation of tablets supporting both Flash and HTML5. It is hoped that in doing so, EPUB3 will help develop an enhanced ebook standard that can be used across a variety of media and content.

Other developments include enhanced metadata support for discoverability, better facilitation support for touchscreen devices, and support for MathML, which we hope will open up greater opportunities for textbook publishers. EPUB3 will be a quantum leap forward in capabilities for future device support, but still backward compatible with current devices on the market.

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Will EPUB3 bring any digital rights management changes?

Bob Kasher: DRM is still optional, and DRM formatting will still be flexible as far as being wrapped with EPUB. There will be no changes in that area.

How will EPUB3 change ereaders and apps?

Bob Kasher: That depends on where content creators take it. As EPUB3 will be backward compatible, it will be usable on current devices, so there won’t be any immediate need for change. However, as new devices open up greater opportunities for readers to access elements not readily available on devices like the Kindle or Kobo or Nook, it will propel accessibility to these attributes in the next generation of ereaders.

With an estimated 80+ new tablet products coming to market this year, I foresee an increasing consumer interest for app-like products that can be accessed through general distribution sites rather than as individual apps.

When will EPUB3 be released? Is the publishing world ready?

Bob Kasher: The draft is being readied for comment and release this month, and we hope to have the final version publicly proclaimed by Book Expo America in May. I think the world will be ready — there is already a lot of testing and development around the product. I fully expect publishers will embrace the re-write quickly and effectively, and we hope it will be one more element fueling the digital transformation of our industry.

This interview was edited and condensed.

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  • http://joeclark.org/weblogs/ Joe Clark

    ePub uses Unicode XHTML files, and as such can readily use non-Latin scripts without “JPEGs.” Nothing at all prevents the use of languages other than the implied American English.

  • Ludwig Hof

    Will ePub 3 support the embedding of web content external to the package, such as YouTube video?

  • http://minaev.blogspot.com Dmitri Minaev

    Am I right that Epub still lacks footnotes? Not endnotes, not hyperlinks, but footnotes. IMHO, this is a much more serious issue than, say, Flash animation.

  • http://hercules.gcsu.edu/~flowney Frank Lowney

    What about the more sophisticated aspects of HTML 5 such as CSS 3, canvass and the like? Has anything like this been included or has the need for speed put a lot of that kind of stuff on the shelf for later versions? What’s next and when?

  • http://www.daisy.org Varju Luceno

    Thank you for your informative article, Jenn. DAISY accessibility standards link should actually point to a different area on our website – DAISYpedia, our information resource.
    DAISYpedia covers a wide variety of topics including the navigable and accessible DAISY reading experience.

  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P31N61Hpwhs Nataraj

    For more info of the epub3
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P31N61Hpwhs